Show Details
Ghost: the Musical
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Ghost: the Musical

Apr 23, 2012 - Aug 19, 2012
Running time: 2:20
PLAYING @
Lunt-Fontanne Theatre
205 W 46th St
New York, NY 10036
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
By Subway: 1,2,3,7,S,N,R,Q,W,A,C,E to 42nd St./Times Square
By Bus: M42
Show Description:

Music

Dave Stewart and Glen Ballard

Lyrics

Dave Stewart and Glen Ballard

Book

Bruce Rubin

Director

Matthew Warchus

Choreography

Ashley Wallen

TDF MEMBER TICKETS:
NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS SHOW
FULL-PRICE TICKETS
$57.00 - $137.00
prices subject to change
Buy Tickets

ADDITIONAL INFO

Listed at TKTS: Frequently
Age Guidance: 13

ACCESSIBILITY INFO

Wheelchairs
There are wheelchair seats in the rear of the Orchestra section.
Seating
All seats require the use of stairs. Accessible tickets are available directly through the Box Office. Call (212) 575-9200 for more information.
Elevator\Escalator
None.
Passenger Loading Zone
Front. Curb 4".
Parking
Lot: West of entrance.
Curb Ramps
(1" lip) NW corner of 46th St. & Broadway; NE corner of 46th St. & 8th Ave.
Entrance
Double doors in series: 1st set (each 29", heavy, 1" saddle) into outer lobby; 2nd set (each 26", heavy) into orchestra.
Box Office
Outer lobby. Counter 48".
Restroom
Located on the basement and mezzanine levels. No handicap accessible facilities available.
Water Fountain
Lower lounge.
Telephone
Lower lounge.
Infrared Listening System
Headsets for sound augmentation are available at the theatre, free of charge. Photo identification is required as a deposit.
Visual
None.

VIDEOS

REVIEWS

Ghost: The Musical is a sentimental pop fantasy — following in a worthy tradition of afterlife romances like Heaven Can Wait and Here Comes Mr. Jordan. But it actually tries to grapple with serious issues of death and loss. Its two stars, Richard Fleeshman and Caissie Levy, throw every ounce of conviction and emotion into their roles; what happens onstage may be fanciful, but their reactions, moment to moment, are credible, honest, human (give director Warchus much of the credit for this).  CONTINUE READING
The projections and other effects, from designer Rob Howell and lighting artist Hugh Vanstone, complement the live performances so fittingly that art is able to imitate life while life imitates art at the same time. Then comes the supernatural: Real actors begin to go through real doors or disappear onstage or pop from the corpses of their newly murdered characters — feats designed by the illusionist Paul Kieve, the man who taught Daniel Radcliffe how to do magic on film.

- Howard Shapiro, The Philadelphia Inquirer
CONTINUE READING

ARTICLES

Apr 25, 2012

Bryce Pinkham and Da'Vine Joy Randolph shape Broadway roles