Show Details
Waitress
You must be logged in to rate this show.
Sign up now to get an account.

Waitress

Mar 15, 2016 - Open Run
Running time: 2:30
PLAYING @
Brooks Atkinson Theatre
256 W 47th St
New York, NY 10036
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
By Bus: Take the M104, M10, M27/M50, M6, M7, or M42 bus.
By Subway: N, R, W to 49th St or the 1, 9 to 50th St, walk south to 47th St and west to the theatre Take the C, E to 50th St, walk south to 47th St and east to the theatre.
Show Description:

Music

Sara Bareilles

Lyrics

Sara Bareilles

Book

Jessie Nelson

Director

Diane Paulus

TDF MEMBER TICKETS:
NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS SHOW
Listed at TKTS:
Frequently
See TKTS Live
FULL-PRICE TICKETS
$69.00 - $159.00
prices subject to change
Buy Tickets

ADDITIONAL INFO

Rush
$40 rush tickets to every performance. The limited number of seats will be sold first come, first served, two per person, beginning at 10 am at the box office.
Audience Advisory
Katharine McPhee will take another shift at the pie diner when she extends her engagement, returning to the show from July 5 – August 19. She made her Broadway debut in the show on April 10; her current engagement ends on June 17.
Age Guidance: 13
Show Notes
1 Intermission

ACCESSIBILITY INFO

Wheelchairs
Wheelchair seating available in the rear of the Orchestra section.
Seating
Orchestra on ground level. Mezzanine and balcony reached only by stairs.
Elevator\Escalator
There are no elevators or escalators at this theatre.
Parking
A parking lot is located directly across the street.
Curb Ramps
SW corner of 47th St. & Broadway; SE corner of 47th St. & 8th Ave.
Entrance
No stairs at entrance. Double doors in series: 1st set (each 28.5", heavy) into outer lobby; 2nd set (each 28.5") into inner lobby.
Box Office
Outer lobby. Counter 43". Floor on slight incline.
Restroom
Unisex: Orchestra level.
Water Fountain
Mezzanine level (up nineteen steps)
Telephone
A pay phone is available on the mezzanine level (up nineteen steps)
Assisted Listening System
Headsets for sound augmentation are available at the theatre, free of charge. Photo identification is required as a deposit.
Visual Assistance
Low vision seats available in the front of the orchestra for purchase in person or on the phone
Folding Armrests
Six (6) mobility seats with folding armrests in the orchestra, Two (2) mobility seats with folding armrests in the mezzanine, which is up 19 stairs
Translation
Certain performances have captions.

VIDEOS

REVIEWS

First came Cyndi Lauper and “Kinky Boots.” Now Sara Bareilles and “Waitress” look ready to double down. Women dismissed for writing fluffy pop hits — “Love Song” in Bareilles’ case — have succeeded where the “serious” likes of U2, Paul Simon, Randy Newman and Sting failed: They’re rocking Broadway. Excuse us while we savor the irony, which is as sweet as the freshly baked pies on sale in the “Waitress” lobby.
Read More of the New York Post Review
“She is gone, but she used to be mine.” I don’t think anyone, hearing that lyric from Waitress, could escape feeling a rush of sadness and exhilaration. Sadness at the line’s multiple meanings; exhilaration in the velvet, heartfelt beauty Jessie Mueller imbues “She Used To Be Mine” with, in the breath-bating 11 o’clock number from this gem of a show.  Waitress, which opened tonight at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre, is the rare musical adaptation that’s as much of a sweetheart as its source, Adrienne Shelly’s 2007 independent film.

Read More of the DateLine Hollywood Review
“Waitress” does a swell job illustrating the shades of gray in human relationships. There are people here holding out for pie in the sky: Gehling’s Dr. Pomatter wants Jenna, but there is the matter of his wife. Becky and Cal are each doing things we could consider morally ambiguous, but their deeds somehow feel forgivable. Jessie Nelson’s book is sharp: “The fuller the condiments, the fuller the experience,” Dawn reminds her boss, in one of her sassier moments. “Waitress” is more than capably directed by Diane Paulus, who started the production cooking last year at the American Repertory Theater, outside Boston. The pie is ready. Leave room for second helpings.



Read More of the NBC New York Review

ARTICLES

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Long Run Time

Jun 02, 2016

A theatre lover wrestles with her fear of lengthy shows

Why Does 'Waitress' Need a Magical Set?

Apr 21, 2016

Inside the Broadway musical's imaginative style?