Theatre Details
Gallery Players

199 14th St

Brooklyn, NY 11217

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

What's Playing

DARK

Theater Description:
TGP resides in a 99-seat theater in Park Slope, Brooklyn. TGP’ s reputation, critical acclaim, and popularity among audiences and artists puts it in an enviable position among its volunteer-only and Off-Off Broadway comparables.Its eclectic programming of intimate revivals and ambitious new work in inventive productions has earned it the reputation of “New York’s Best Kept Secret.” Among its famous alumni are founding member Harvey Fierstein; Broadway regulars Nancy Anderson, Jeffry Denman, and Diedre Goodwin; New York theater personality Seth Rudetsky; and many others.

The first two decades of The Gallery Players’ history set the tone of determination, resourcefulness, and dedication to professional-level productions that continues to be the trademark of the company to this day. In 1967 founder Bruce Wyatt relocated from New Orleans to Brooklyn, bringing the name and concept of his New Orleans theater organization, The Gallery Players, with him. The Gallery Players’ Brooklyn incarnation first was introduced in Flatbush, and one year later they relocated to the St. Paul’s Church at St. John’s Place and 7th Avenue in Park Slope, the neighborhood that has been its home since. 1974 saw another move, this time to the Old First Church at Carroll Street and 7th Avenue. In 1978 The Gallery Players became an Equity Showcase house, inviting professional actors to use the Gallery performances as an opportunity to display and hone their skills. The Gallery Players remained at the Old First Church until 1984, at which time they moved again, this time to the Berkeley-Carroll School, before a period of two years during which the group had no home. True to their spirit, this did not deter the troupe from performing, and such productions as the musical They’re Playing Our Song continued to be mounted at the St. John-St. Matthew-Emanuel Community Center on 7th Street between 6th & 7th Avenues, now the Kingsboro Temple.

1989-1990 was The Gallery Players’ first season at 199 Fourteenth Street in Park Slope, the venue that came to be the group’s permanent home. This debut season saw productions of Man of La Mancha, Frankie and Johnny in the Claire de Lune, The Dining Room, Nuts, The Boys Next Door, and a double bill of Christopher Durang’s one-act plays The Actor’s Nightmare and Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You. Initially concentrating on “barebones’ presentations, by the time of their pivotal production of Stephen Sondheim’s A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, a full stage had been installed