14 Dance Performances to See in NYC This Fall
By JUAN MICHAEL PORTER II
Friday, September 16, 2022  •  
Fri Sep 16, 2022  •  
Dance  •   0 comments Share This

Catch NYCB and ABT, international companies at New York City Center and BAM more

Kick off fall with a rich and varied slate of dance performances, including the bigwigs New York City Ballet and American Ballet Theatre, international companies at Fall for Dance, The Joyce Theater and BAM, and hometown favorites such as Camille A. Brown.

In terms of COVID-19 safety protocols, most of the shows listed below require masks, and a few check vaccination status. While we are doing our best to keep this article up to date, before buying tickets to any event, double-check the COVID-19 rules so you are prepared.

If you're a TDF member, log in to your account to see what we're selling as ticket inventory changes frequently.

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Splitting My Sides

Theater for the New City, 155 First Avenue between Ninth and Tenth Streets in the East Village

Runs September 14-18. If you're a TDF member, log in to your account to purchase discount tickets.

Proof of vaccination required. Masks are optional but encouraged.

A multimedia dance-theatre collaboration between vocal dynamo Breezy Lee, drag diva Joey Arias, corset couturier Mister Pearl, costumers from Oceanallover, and choreographers Laura Victoria Ward and Alex Rigg, Splitting My Sides is an eye-popping exploration of personal evolution. Inspired by the process of reptiles shedding their skin, the show consists of several short chapters featuring performers casting off layers of costumes to transform and grow. Part of Theater for the New City's eclectic Dream Up Festival.

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Kyle Marshall Choreography: Onyx

Abrons Arts Center, 466 Grand Street at Pitt Street on the Lower East Side

Runs September 16-17

Masks are required.

After coming to fame as an acclaimed member of the Trisha Brown Dance Company, Kyle Marshall has come into his own as a highly nuanced choreographer who explores Black bodies, queerness and how Black culture is consumed in his work. This month, he's presenting two preview performances of Onyx about how Black and brown people pioneered American rock 'n' roll. Set to a soundtrack of Little Richard, Death, James Brown, Tina Turner, Big Mama Thornton and Sister Rosetta Tharpe, the 40-minute piece features Marshall alongside Bree Breeden, Niara Hardister, Nik Owens and Cayleen Del Rosario. I & I, Marshall's powerful tribute to Black Jamaican bodies, is also on the bill.

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New York City Ballet Fall Season

David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center, 20 Lincoln Center Plaza at 62nd Street and Columbus Avenue in Lincoln Square

Runs September 20-October 16. If you're a TDF member, log in and search for NYC Ballet to purchase discount tickets.

Masks are required.

New York City Ballet returns to Lincoln Center with five distinct programs. As always, the treasure trove of masterpieces by the company's founding ballet master and choreographer, George Balanchine, is well represented, with works by Jerome Robbins and Alexei Ratmansky providing brilliant contrast to his neoclassical wonders. Must-sees include Balanchine's Stravinsky Violin Concerto, Divertimento No. 15, Episodes, Apollo, Symphony in Three Movements and Symphony in C; Robbins' Piano Pieces, The Cage and Fancy Free; and Ratmansky's Concerto DSCH. Meanwhile, a landmark: Pop icon Solange Knowles is making history as the first Black woman to write music for the troupe with her score for a new ballet choreographed by rising talent Gianna Reisen.

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Fall for Dance Festival

New York City Center, 131 West 55th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues in Midtown West

Runs September 21-October 2.

Masks are required.

New York City Center's beloved Fall for Dance Festival returns for its 19th season with companies from the US, France, Germany, India, The Netherlands, Spain and Ukraine. Each evening features three different troupes with varying styles for only $20 per ticket, so you can afford to take chances. Every lineup has at least one must-see performance: Hervé Koubi 's Boys Don't Cry and Johan Inger's Bliss in Program 1; Leonardo Sandoval 's company Music from the Sole in Program 2; James Gilmer from Alvin Ailey in a solo created by the troupe's resident choreographer Jamar Roberts in Program 3; Ukraine's Kyiv City Ballet in the NY premiere of Thoughts and Men of Kyiv in Program 4; and India's Nrityagram Dance Ensemble in Poornarati in Program 5.

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Tabula Rasa Dance Theater: Oedipus Rex

New York Live Arts, 219 West 19th Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues in Chelsea

Runs September 27-October 2.

Proof of full vaccination and masks are required.

Tabula Rasa resets Sophocles' 2,500-year-old tragedy Oedipus Rex in a modern-day nightclub in this high-tech dance-theatre piece featuring laser light effects and an EDM score. The narrative follows the impact of COVID-19 on Oedipus' livelihood as he and his colleagues seek out information and try to survive. Much like the original Greek epic, it's a tragedy, with choreographer Felipe Escalante highlighting the effects of domestic and structural violence within the story. To make the performance accessible to marginalized communities, .63 cent tickets are available to formerly incarcerated individuals and their families as well as survivors of gender-based violence.

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Valerie Green/Dance Entropy: HOME

Gibney 280, 53A Chambers Street at Broadway in the Financial District

Runs September 29-October 1.

Proof of full vaccination and masks are required.

Celebrated dance curator and choreographer Valerie Greene premieres HOME, an international cross-collaborative project with dance-makers from six countries: Maria Naidu from Sweden, Ashley Lobo from India, Souleymane Badolo from Burkina Faso, Sandra Paola López Ramírez from Colombia, Bassam Abou Diab from Lebanon and Green with her Queens-based troupe Dance Entropy. The full-length evening of commissioned works offers a half dozen takes on the meaning of home, each infused with the individual artist's cultural and personal perspective.

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Queensboro Dance Festival 2022 Finale

Queens Theatre, 14 United Nations Avenue South in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Corona, Queens

Runs September 30-October 2

Masks are optional but encouraged.

Throughout the summer, this festival has presented performances by more than two dozen Queens-based dance companies at various sites across the borough. For the grand finale, you can see all 26 participating troupes in a jam-packed, three-night celebration at the Queens Theatre that reflects the borough's glorious diversity of cultures. NK&D/a movement company, the Greek American Folklore Society, Umami Playground, Flamenco Latino, Fanike! African Dance Troupe, Manhatitlan Mexican Folkloric Dance Group and chrisbelldances are just a taste of the eclectic lineup.

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Malpaso Dance Company

Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street in Chelsea

Runs October 4-9. If you're a TDF member, log in to your account to purchase discount tickets.

Masks are required.

Cuba's premiere modern dance company, Malpaso, brings its beautifully trained performers back to The Joyce for a weeklong run. The wide-ranging program features four pieces: woman with water by the highly successful though esoteric Swedish dance-maker Mats Ek; Stillness in Bloom, a commission from crowd-pleasing choreographer Aszure Barton; Robyn Mineko Williams' Elemental and Nana Para un Insomnio (Lullaby for Insomnia), a solo by created by company member Dailedys Carrazana.

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Open for Everything

BAM Harvey Theater, 651 Fulton Street between Ashland and Rockwell Places in Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Runs October 5-8.

Masks are optional but encouraged.

Choreographer Constanza Macras explores Romani culture in his dance-theatre extravaganza Open for Everything, an exuberant variation on old-world dance and music traditions. Three characters aspire to a brighter future, including a trans woman, a mother raising and her precocious daughter and an ambitious male dancer. Seventeen Roma performers join five members of Macras' Berlin-based troupe DorkyPark for this celebration of humanity and hope that counters harmful stereotypes about the Romani people.

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CROWD

BAM Howard Gilman Opera House, 30 Lafayette Avenue between Ashland Place and St. Felix Street in Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Runs October 13-15.

Masks are optional but encouraged.

French choreographer Gisèle Vienne conjures the loopy energy of an underground EDM rave to explore the notion of losing oneself on the dancefloor. Using synchronized yet individualized bursts of movement, she plays with the audience's sense of time across 15 intertwining tales, all danced to electronic artists who were big on the Detroit scene in the '90s. Note: strobe light are used in the production.

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Cookin'

The New Victory Theater, 209 West 42nd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues in Midtown West

Runs October 14-30.

Masks are required.

Not a typical dance performance, this zany physical theatre piece brings the shenanigans of a crazed kitchen to life with Korean samul nori drumming and martial arts as four off-the-wall chefs race to prepare a last-minute wedding feast. This delectable concoction of athleticism, dance, tricks, percussion and food prep is celebrating its 25th anniversary, making it the longest-running show in South Korean history.

Kinding Sindaw: Posaka

La MaMa's The Downstairs, 66 East 4th Street between the Bowery and Second Avenue in the East Village

Runs October 20-23.

Masks are required.

Kinding Sindaw celebrates its 30th anniversary with Posaka, an exploration of displacement, resilience and collective healing in Filipino culture. The company is made up of indigenous tradition-bearers and Filipino-American artists and educators who partner with local musicians, dancers and martial artists to perform healing chants, gong ringing and sensual movements.

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American Ballet Theatre: Fall Season

David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center, 20 Lincoln Center Plaza at 62nd Street and Columbus Avenue in Lincoln Square

Runs October 20-30.

Masks are required.

ABT's fall lineup includes a pair of beloved classics and an exciting new work. The returning fan favorites are Frederick Ashton's The Dream, a glorious reimagining of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream set to the music of Mendelssohn and featuring Gillian Murphy as Titania (her only appearance this season), and resident choreographer Alexei Ratmansky's full-length confection Whipped Cream danced to Richard Strauss' score. The world premiere Lifted choreographed by Christopher Rudd features an all-Black cast of dancers in celebration of Black creativity. This new ballet was specifically commissioned by ABT's artistic director Kevin McKenzie, who is retiring in December after 30 years, and represents the company's commitment to invest in powerful yet long-neglected and marginalized artists.

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Camille A. Brown & Dancers: The Trilogy

Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street in Chelsea

Masks are required.

Runs October 25-30.

Fresh off her Tony-nominated direction and choreography for the Broadway revival of for colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf, Camille A. Brown returns to concert dance with a trio of pieces developed over the last decade. The first two are being performed at The Joyce: BLACK GIRL: Linguistic Play, Brown's ode to Black girl creativity, and the Bessie Award-winning Mr. TOL E. RancE, her comedic punch in the face about what it takes to live while Black in this country. The final work in the trilogy, the world premiere ink, will be performed at the Apollo Theater on November 4 and 5, with ticket holders for the Joyce shows receiving a 15% discount. All three pieces focus on Black identity, joy and thriving.

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Trajal Harrell: Maggie the Cat

NYU Skirball, 566 LaGuardia Place at Washington Square South in the West Village

Runs October 27-29. If you're a TDF member, log in to your account to purchase discount tickets.

Proof of full vaccination plus a booster dose and masks are required.

Acclaimed choreographer Trajal Harrell returns to New York with his dance interpretation of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, but instead of focusing on Brick, he flips the story on its head by making Maggie the story's true center. The provocative results unleash Maggie's unbridled lust for power as Harrell infuses the proceedings with voguing, high fashion (there's a catwalk, of course) and humor in this highbrow-pop-art hybrid.

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Unavailable Memory: In Conversation with Cunningham & Cage

Baryshnikov Arts Center, 450 West 37th Street between Ninth and Tenth Avenues in Midtown West

Runs October 27-29.

Conceived and curated by Patricia Lent—the director of licensing for the Cunningham Trust who danced with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company from 1984 to 1993—this evening features dance by Cunningham—Totem Ancestor (1942) and Loops (1971)—and music by John Cage performed live by Adam Tendler. The conversational part of the evening comes from the multigenerational juxtaposition of new pieces: telemetry3, created by four Juilliard students under the mentorship of Cunningham stalwart Rashaun Mitchell, and Tether by Beve Miller.

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Juan Michael Porter II is the staff writer for TheBody.com and a contributor to TDF Stages, Did They Like It?, SF Chronicle, Christian Science Monitor, American Theatre, them, Into More and SYFY Wire. He is a National Critics Institute and Poynter Power of Diverse Voices Fellow. Follow him at @juanmichaelii. Follow TDF at @ TDFNYC.

Top image: Camille A. Brown & Dancers in BLACK GIRL: Linguistic Play, which is being performed at The Joyce Theater in October. Photo by Christopher Duggan.




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