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Orpheum Theatre

Address

126 Second Ave
New York, NY 10003

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Orpheum Theatre

Public Transportation

Subway Icon

By Subway:

6 train to Astor Place or N or R train to 8th St

Bus Icon

By Bus:

M13, M15, M102 or M103

Accessibility:

Box Office

Box Office

Lobby. Counter 42".

Parking

Parking

SVI Permit. Lot: Astor Place (entrance on 4th Ave.).

Curb Ramps

Curb Ramps

Most corners.

Directions Bus

Directions Bus

M13, M15, M102 or M103

Restroom

Restroom

Womens and Mens: 2nd floor. Up twenty-six steps.

Directions Subway

Directions Subway

6 train to Astor Place or N or R train to 8th St

Elevator\Escalator

Elevator\Escalator

None.

Telephone

Telephone

None.

Entrance

Entrance

Ground level. Two sets of double doors (each 32") into lobby. Five steps up into theater.

Visual Assistance

Visual Assistance

None.

Water Fountain

Water Fountain

None.

Assisted Listening System

Assisted Listening System

Assistive listening devices available.

Wheelchair Info

Wheelchair Info

Not accessible

Theater Description:

The Orpheum Theatre is a 299-seat Off-Broadway theatre on Second Avenue near the corner of St. Marks Place in the East Villageneighborhood of lower Manhattan, New York City. It is the home of the New York production of Stomp since it opened in 1994 with over 5,000 performances of the show have taken place there.There may have been a concert garden on the site as early as the 1880s, but there was a theatre there by 1904.[1] During the heyday ofYiddish theatre in the Yiddish Theater District in Manhattan, the venue was the Player's Theatre, and was part of the "Jewish Rialto" along Second Avenue.[2] By the 1920s, the theatre was exhibiting films, but was converted back to dramatic use in 1958,[1] with the first production, Little Mary Sunshine, opening in November 1959.[3]Significant productions include the revival and revamping of Cole Porter's musical Anything Goes in 1962, Your Own Thing in 1968, The Me Nobody Knows in 1970, The Cocktail Party in 1980, Key Exchange in 1981, Broken Toys! in 1981, Little Shop of Horrors in 1982, Sandra Bernhard's Without You I'm Nothing in 1988, The Lady in Question in 1989, Eric Bogosian's Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll in 1990, John Leguizamo's Mambo Mouth in 1991, and David Mamet's Oleanna in 1992.[3]