Show Details
Sweat
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Sweat

Mar 04, 2017 - Jun 25, 2017
Running time: 2:20
PLAYING @
Studio 54
254 W 54th St
New York, NY 10019
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
By Subway: N, R, Q, W to 57th St, South to 54th St, West to theatre
Show Description:

Director

Kate Whoriskey

Written By

Lynn Nottage

TDF MEMBER TICKETS:
AVAILABLE
Listed at TKTS:
Occasionally
See TKTS Live
FULL-PRICE TICKETS
$59.00 - $149.00
prices subject to change
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ADDITIONAL INFO

Audience Advisory
Adult themes & language
Age Guidance: 13
Show Notes
1 Intermission

ACCESSIBILITY INFO

Wheelchairs
Theatre is wheelchair accessible on the Orchestra level only. Wheelchair seating is available in the Orchestra only.
Seating
920
Entrance
No steps into theatre from sidewalk.
Restroom
On mezzanine level
Assisted Listening System
Infrared Listening Devices are available

REVIEWS

In “Sweat,” Lynn Nottage goes where few playwrights have dared to go — into the heart of working-class America. Her insightfully observed characters all went to the same schools, work at the same factory, drink at the same bar, and are going to hell in the same hand basket. Their jobs, their community, and their way of life are doomed, in director Kate Whoriskey’s mercilessly realistic production, although no one seems to have gotten the message yet.

Read More of the Variety Review
For a brief moment before the November election, the news was filled with stories about disenfranchised blue-collar voters in the Rust Belt. At the same time, smack in the eye of the news cycle, “Sweat” — Lynn Nottage’s drama about lives destroyed when factories moved to Mexico from Reading, Pennsylvania — had a justly celebrated Off-Broadway run at the Public Theater.Although the cameras soon moved on to sexier topics, the drama, now on Broadway, is just as meaningful, just as powerful, equally far-reaching and intimate.

Read More of the Newsday Review
“Sweat” is an involving drama, calibrated to increase in intensity toward its brutal climax. Nottage, who won a Pulitzer for “Ruined,” explores her characters and their environment with the sensitivity of a master dramatist and the objectivity of a journalist. She doesn’t provide any answers, only the faintest hope that people will take care of each other, even in desperate circumstances.
Read More of the amNewYork Review

ARTICLES

Can These Friendships Survive Factory Layoffs?

Mar 17, 2017

A Broadway play explores a working-class community

The Way He Walks Says Everything

Nov 02, 2016

Khris Davis' gut-wrenching physical transformation gets at the heart of 'Sweat'